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JournalSpring2014

The photo of Soror Shropshire singing “We Shall Overcome” alongside Golden Frinks, assistant to Dr. Martin Luther King that now hangs in the Library of Congress and is part of the Smithsonian billboard. PHOTO COURTE SY OF JACQUELYN BOND-SHROPSHIRE THROUGH THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS JOURNAL Spring 2014 s73 in the forefront during the march in ’63, it is no surprise that Delta Sigma Theta was front and center in 2013. Hundreds of members gathered on the right side of the reflecting pool to stand with the leadership of the or-ganization and display the Sorority’s resolve to never tire in the relentless struggle for civil rights. Program participants included the presence of Sorors Ingrid Saun-ders Jones, chair of the National Council of Negro Women; U.S. Con-gresswoman Marcia Fudge, 21st Na-tional President of Delta Sigma Theta; Reverend Shirley Caesar; and Marian Wright Edelman, presi-dent of the Children’s Defense Fund. “The impact of that march still leads and influences us to-day. If Dr. King and Dr. Height were here to-day, they would charge us with facilitating the next generational shift. All we have to do to know about ‘change’ is to look down Pennsylvania Avenue to the president of the United States and we’ll know that their aspirations were not in vain,” said Soror Saun-ders Jones in her remarks. Both marches left an indelible and life-changing impression on at-tendees. Dr. Walker spoke of how attending the 1963 march has had lasting effects on her life and how the 2013 march and its familiar theme concerns her. “You can’t go to a march like that in 1963 and go back to your normal life. You can have the same routine, but life truly changes,” said Dr. Walker. “It’s prom-ising that we can still come together to march, but it is also somewhat painful that we are still here for the ex-act same reason 50 years later. I hope when people talk about Delta Sigma Theta 50 years from now, that they can say that, as National President, I helped ‘turn the ships around.’” The reference to “turn the ships around” refers to the idea that the history of the diaspora may have had a different outcome if the ances-tors – initially welcoming sailors to Africa’s shores – might have refused the arrival of the very ships that later enslaved them. “It’s about changing history. Del-ta will continue to be the force that can turn this country around, for the better,” said Dr. Walker. s Members gather at the reflecting pool during the 50th Anniversary March in Washington, D.C., August 24, 2013. Photo by Sharon Farmer


JournalSpring2014
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