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Soror Marliceia Chavers, member of Jefferson County Alum-nae Chapter, delivers her powerful poetry piece during the chapter’s Real Talk: An Evening of Spoken Word, Song and Art program. photo by photography that fitts JOURNAL Spring 2014 s77 ful keynote address by Dr. Charles G. Adams, pastor of Hartford Memorial Baptist Church and a vocal apartheid opponent in his own right. Dr. Adams was also one of 10 activists who received the “Aman-dla Award” for their leadership of anti-apartheid efforts in Michigan. “Amandla” is a Xhosa and Zulu word meaning “power” that was often used as a slogan for the anti-apartheid movement. Other honorees included: Margaret Baylor, Akua Budu-Watkins, Dr. Gloria House, The Hon. Carolyn Cheeks Kilpatrick, Shahida Mausi- Johnson, Christine Root, The Hon. Audley “Kano” Smith, The Hon. Virgil C. Smith and Dr. David Wiley. Soror Alicia Nails, director of the Journal-ism Institute for Media Diversity at Wayne State University, was the event’s mistress of ceremonies. Proceeds from the event were do-nated to the Adelaide Tambo School for the Disabled in Soweto, South Af-rica. Named for the late wife of late African National Congress President Oliver Tambo, the Adelaide Tambo School educates nearly 400 students with physical and developmental dis-abilities. s Iota Rho Chapter celebrated its 40th anniversary the weekend of Nov. 30. During this three-day event, sorors from lines dating back to the 1970s returned to the campus of University of North Carolina at Charlotte. The weekend began with a meet-and-greet social Friday night. Cur-rent Iota Rho members in uniform cardigans and khakis mingled amongst former chapter members who shared memories of their years on campus. On Saturday morn-ing, sorors returned to campus to participate in a prayer breakfast. Soror Pam Hemphill provided an inspirational message. Following the prayer break-fast, attendees participated in a community service event at a local battered women’s shel-ter. A semi-formal banquet was held Saturday evening. Iota Rho members had the privilege of hosting charter members, Jackie Steven-Sand-ers, Maudine Cornish and Barbara Washington as well as Soror Bertha Maxwell Rod-dey, 20th National President, who served at as the keynote speaker. Soror Britney Onuma served as chair for the 40th anniversary celebration. s The Arts & Letters committee of the Jefferson County Alumnae Chapter presented the inau-gural edition of “Real Talk: An Evening of Spoken Word, Song and Art” benefiting the Sickle Cell Foundation of Al-abama. “Real Talk” was held on Feb. 2, 2013 at Frames on the Green and featured the exceptional work of singers and poets from the Birming-ham area such as co-host Glenwood, Sickle Cell Ad-vocate Tina Kay, Marliceia Chavers, Southern Boy Buff, Tamika “Blaqdiamond” Glen and Illyshia Parker. Several artists displayed their art work and jewelry line as a live band set the atmosphere ablaze with smooth and sultry music. With the success of raising over $1,000, the chapter looks forward to their continued partnership with the Sickle Cell Association in bringing awareness to a disease largely affecting African- Americans. s The Marietta-Roswell Alumnae Chapter adopted 25 families, includ-ing 62 children, for Christmas 2012. The MRAC is charged with providing innovative and impactful community programs for the Cobb, Cherokee and North Fulton Georgia areas. Soon af- Members of the Marietta-Roswell Alumnae Chapter preparing gifts for children during their Community Christmas Celebration. (PICTURED L–R) Sorors Kim Trent, National Social Ac-tion Commissioner; Soraya Williams Farver, Inkster Chapter president; and Traci Featherstone, Inkster In-ternational Awareness co-chair award anti-apartheid activist Dr. Charles Adams (CENTER) during Inkster Alumnae’s Praise Song for Mandela program.


JournalSpring2014
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