Page 41

18_JournalSpring2016_0503_2 (2)

52nd National Convention C O V E R A G E During the Public Meeting, Delta Sigma Theta recognized chapters who held exemplary Heritage Celebra-tion JOURNAL Spring 2016 s39 tors and pointed to his commitment to keep the challenges of the class-room on the top of his mind. He also challenged the audience to guaran-tee children are given the best expe-riences to ensure success whether in the classroom or in the community. As a former World History teach-er, Clyburn also recalled historical, political and social injustices. He re-minded the audience of Deltas and guests to avoid repeating the trag-edies of the past. He also urged the audience to grasp the role they play in making communities and schools better by leading people to the polls and encouraging engagement with school boards. “All of us have to commit to mak-ing sure our children and our grand-children don’t live what we and our parents once lived,” said Clyburn. The Public Meeting concluded with the recognition and presenta-tion of awards. The National Heritage and Archives Committee presented 12 chapters with awards for their ini-tiatives that have major impacts on the lives in their communities. The awarding of the 2015–2017 Distinguished Professor Endowed Chair was presented by Soror Joan Prince, chair of the Distinguisted Pro-fessor Endowed Chair Task Force, to North Carolina Central University in Durham, NC. The Distinguished Professor En-dowed Chair was established un-der the administration of Dr. Thel-ma T. Daley, 16th National President and co-chair of the Ritual and Cer-emonies Commission. The grant is presented biennially to a Historical Black College or University that pro-vides support for a professor of dis-tinction to be in residence. During the presentation of Pres-ident’s Award, Dr. Paulette C. Walk-er, National President of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., jokingly referred to this year’s recipient as the “walk-ing encyclopedia, reference book and resource” of the Sorority. Soror Rose-line McKinney, Executive Director for the organization, received the esteemed award. So-ror McKinney was sur-prised to receive an hon-or for her outstanding service and commitment to the organization for over 40 years. Dr. Walker also presented Deborah Somerville, Interim Direc-tor of Information Sys-tems at Delta Sigma The-ta, with an appreciation award for over 30 years of service on the Nation-al Headquarters staff. Somerville retired in ear-ly 2015. The Sorority’s highest honor—The Mary Church Terrell Award—was pre-sented to Soror Amelia Platts Boynton Robinson. Soror Rob-inson, an Honorary Member of the Sorority, received the award for be-ing an influential figure in the Civ-il Rights Movement. Robinson, age 103, was on the front lines of the 1965 march from Selma to Montgomery to protest Blacks’ voting rights. She is portrayed by Oprah Winfrey in the critically-acclaimed film, “Selma.” As the thousands of attendees, departed the convention center, many echoed the sentiments that life without the guidance of an educa-tor— to inspire, correct and lead—is simply unimaginable. “We have so much more to do in the area of education,” said So-ror Victoria Mosely Rivers, member of the Philadelphia Alumnae Chapter. “As a retired educator, I believe we must always continue to make cer-tain we’re involved as a Sorority. It’s only through education that our chil-dren will learn the truth about what we’ve done as a people.” s Day events in 2015. PHOTO BY SHARON FARMER


18_JournalSpring2016_0503_2 (2)
To see the actual publication please follow the link above