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52nd National Convention R E G I O N A L C O V E R A G E “How the Midwest was One” s58 Unity, Black Womanhood and Social Change Members of the Midwest Region take a moment for prayer during the Midwest Sisterhood Lun-cheon. DELTA SIGMA THETA SORORITY, INC. BY SIERRA J. AUSTIN To commemorate the histor-ic gathering of approximately 13,000 members of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Incorporated in Hous-ton, Texas for the 52nd National Con-vention, Mona Davenport, Midwest Regional Director, enthusiastical-ly addressed sorors at the Mighty Midwest Regional Sisterhood Luncheon aptly themed “How the Midwest was One.” This pun, adapted from the 1963 American film “How the West Was Won,” harbors great historical and geo-graphical significance. The film chronicles several generations of a family expanding across the United States for greater oppor-tunity as they experience monu-mental events such as the Gold Rush, the Civil War, and the con-struction of transcontinental rail-roads, which facilitated the rap-id industrialization that made the country a world power. As a metaphor for the 102 years of generational expansion and monumental work Delta has and will continue to do, this adage was most appropriate for the occasion. Before highlighting the ex-traordinary work and much-de-served accolades of chapters and so-rors of the Midwest Region, the tone of the luncheon was set by the Mid-west Region Choir, which gave a pow-erful rendition of the critically ac-claimed, award winning song “Glory” performed by Common and John Leg-end. This was significant for several reasons. First, it set a tone for and so-lidified the motif of one point of the Sorority’s Five-Point Programmatic Thrust – political awareness and in-volvement. Hearing the choir’s ren-dition of this contemporary anthem of the Black community reinforces that in the wake of police brutality and other forms of injustice nation-ally, Delta must remain a progressive thought and service leader. Second, hearing this particular song performed by women is trans-gressive and noteworthy because both historically and contemporar-ily – from anti-lynching movements to BlackLivesMatter, political dis-courses about Black violability and racial violence tend to center on the narratives of men and boys, creating the need for “sub-movements” such PHOTO BY DONNAMARIA JONES


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