Page 95

18_JournalSpring2016_0503_2 (2)

Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Mourns the “Queen Mother of the Civil Rights Movement” and Honorary Member Amelia Platts Boynton Robinson Delta Sigma Theta and the world lost a true champion for justice and combatant of injustice—the “Queen Mother of the Civil Rights Movement” and Honorary Member, Soror Amelia Platts Boynton Robinson. She made her transition into the Omega Omega Chapter August 26, 2015. She was 104 years old. “Soror Boynton Robinson lived a life that was not her own,” said Dr. Paulette C. Walk-er, National President of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority. “It is be-cause of her sacrifices and re-lentless advocacy for basic human freedoms for African Americans that we all can stand where we are today.” Soror Boynton Robinson was born in Savannah, Geor-gia in 1911 to George Platts and Anna Elizabeth Hicks Platts. From her parents, she and her siblings learned four principles of life: daily praying, always helping and showing compas-sion for others, standing up for the morally right, and becoming economically independent. Amelia Platts Boynton Robinson She began her public service to American voters and voting rights at the age of nine, when she first accompanied her mother to hand out leaflets for the Women’s Suffrage Movement. In 1936, Boynton Robinson married Sam W. Boynton and began a 30-year partnership in bringing voting rights, property and home ownership to Blacks in poor and rural areas of Alabama. In the 1950’s Boynton Robinson met Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Coretta Scott King at the Dexter Street Baptist Church in Montgom-ery, Alabama, where King was the preacher. It is also the location where Boynton Robinson or-ganized the first boycott by African Americans in Alabama after a Selma woman died from be-ing dragged by a bus. In 1964, she was the first black woman ever to seek a seat in the US Congress; she received 11 percent of the primary vote in a locale where only five percent of African Americans could vote. This makes her the first woman, white or black, to have the Democratic nomination in Alabama. The “Bloody Sunday” at-tempted march from Selma to Montgomery to protest African American exclusion from vot-ing was planned at the Boyn-ton home. On March 7, 1965, Boynton Robinson marched at the head of the demonstrators and became one of the first vic-tims of the violence that ensued as officials were ordered to beat any protestors refusing to disperse. She was struck down and presumed dead at the foot of the Edmund Pettus Bridge. In the days that followed, the fa-mous photograph of Boynton Robinson aroused anger and disgust throughout the nation and around the world. In 2014, Boynton Robinson was properly portrayed in the universally acclaimed mov-ie Selma, directed by Ava DuVernay. At the age of 103, Amelia Boynton Robinson, the “Queen Mother” of the civil rights movement crossed the Edmund Pettus Bridge with President Obama holding her hand at the 50th anniversa-ry of “Bloody Sunday.” Soror Boynton Robinson most recently was the recipient of the Sorority’s highest hon-or, the Mary Church Terrell Award, during the 52nd National Convention in Houston this past July. s JOURNAL Spring 2016 s93


18_JournalSpring2016_0503_2 (2)
To see the actual publication please follow the link above