Page 49

SummerJournal2013

Distinguished members and guests attend the pre-march rally at the steps of the U.S. Capitol Building in Washington, D.C. PICTURED (LEFT TO RIGHT) Bishop Vashti Murphy McKenzie, national chaplain; Congresswoman Joyce Beatty; DC Police Chief Cathy Lanier; Page Harrington, executive director of the Sewall-Belmont House and Museum; Joan Bradley Wages, president/CEO of the National Women’s History Museum; Soror Julianne Malveaux; Daphne Maxwell Reid, honorary member; and Suzzanne Douglas Cobb, honorary JOURNAL Summer 2013 s47 eled to D.C. in order to participate in this history-making moment. Even members confined to wheel chairs and crutches did not let their physical impairments prevent them from completing the 3.1 mile route down Pennsylvania Ave., pass the White House, and ending at the Washington Monument. “I’ve been on several marches and sometimes people don’t last or don’t make it 3 miles. We heard very few things about people dropping out, fainting or becoming ill,” said Soror Sandra Jaribu Hill, member, National Social Action Commission. “I was so inspired to walk behind Soror Frankie Freeman, who penned lyrics along with Soror Carla Harris who created the music on the spot for a song we sang as we marched. She and all of the past presidents were such an inspiration.” Members who volunteered to be marshals the morning of the march were just as enthusiastic to direct march participants along the route. “I was moved by the march and it was a privilege to serve as a volunteer,” said Soror Anita Walls of Prince George’s County Alumnae Chapter. “The march was absolutely amazing,” said Soror Libra Forde of Hawaii Alumnae Chapter. “Every step I took, I felt so blessed to be able to take that experience back to Hawaii to share that feeling of being with everyone marching together. The march concluded at the Washington Monument where members gathered to hear final words to carry them into the next 100 years of advocacy. Representatives from Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc., Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, Inc., League of Women Voters, and the National Organization for Women expressed their solidarity with Delta Sigma Theta’s initiatives in their remarks before and after the march. They also paid tribute to Delta’s Founders for their bravery, acknowledged their role in women’s suffrage and congratulated the Sorority for 100 years of service and advocacy for women’s rights. Rep. Fudge closed the rally with the final charge to the attendees. “I want us to put our footprints down on Pennsylvania Avenue, the White House and the Washington Monument for a purpose,” said Soror Fudge. “Don’t just go home and say ‘I marched.’ Say ‘I marched because I stand on the foundation of our Founders and they are still lifting us up today so we can do the work we must do.” Other organizations participating in the march included: Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc., National Council of Negro Women, National Women’s History Project, National Women’s History Museum, Alpha Pi Chi National Sorority, Inc. and Unitewomen.org. s member. PHOTO BY LEATHA SPIVEY Collegiate members representing varying chapters of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority pose as the 22 Founders during the Suffrage March reenactment. PHOTO BY SHARON FARMER


SummerJournal2013
To see the actual publication please follow the link above