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have a limited enrollment. But, HBCU Dr. Malveaux: Well fi rst of all, I’d life can be one of the most enhancing like to say how grateful I am to my So- things for a young person. Not only in rority. We had a four-year scholarship terms of their education, but in terms funded by the Sorority, and last year of life long relationships, in terms of the college was the recipient of the two nurturing and caring that comes at our year Distinguished Professor Endowed colleges and in terms of, literally, the Chair. Soror Linda Wilson, who was sense of reverberation with history. our former regional director, had em- braced the college in terms of some DELTA Journal: What makes an fundraising. I’d like to see that kind of HBCU education unique? thing continue. The Sorority can basi- The story I like to tell is when I went to cally embrace Historically Black Col- college in 1970, there were questions leges and Universities, especially the at the predominately white institution two that are focused on women, Ben- one. Every African-American person that I went to, about whether or not Af- nett and Spelman. Embrace Historical- needs to feel some investment in what rican-American students are capable. ly Black Colleges and Universities and I call “HBCU Land.” We need these col- Here we know you’re capable. No one support them fi nancially and in other leges, they are so very important for will ever raise a question about your ways. I’ve been grateful to have had our community, for our activism, for race or about your gender in terms of former presidents Mona Bailey and our education, for our legacy. Really, your capabilities. You are assumed Gwen Boyd come to my college. I’m a greater sense of involvement and en- to be smart. You are assumed to be grateful for the support that the Soror- gagement is one of the ways we can bright. If you don’t do well, the assump- ity has shown us here before and look deal with some of these issues. I think tion is that you dropped the ball, but forward to many more years of it. also, people need to see HBCUs as the it’s not because of your capabilities. training ground for our future leaders, We assume that our students are go- DELTA Journal: How can individ- for the young people who are going to ing to excel. I don’t think you’re going uals and communities at large lead Black America in the future. to fi contribute to the success of HB- nd that. You still have enough ste- reotypes in the rest of the world that I CUs? DELTA Journal: What are the don’t think you fi People can give money, people can nd that. But here, it is greatest successes of HBCUs to assumed that you will do well. give time, people can raise awareness, date? people can send us students, people Dr. Malveaux: I think our greatest can do all of those things. We needHow can DeltasDELTA Journal: successes are our students. If you look your help. ▲contribute to the success of HB- CUs? at the young people that we produce, the young people who graduate. We say at Bennett that “the girl you are meets the woman you are going to be- come.” I think our successes are in our people. The way we produce people who have a sense of passion, a sense of history and a sense of legacy. DELTA Journal: Why do you think HBCUs are still relevant today? Dr. Malveaux: First of all, we ex- ist to produce young people with a sense of history and a sense of mis- sion. We exist to the legacy of the Mary McCloud Bethunes, the people who built these colleges. It’s not just a legacy, it’s also the future. You can’t fi nd anything like an HBCU education. It’s something that is so unique and so special. And of course HBCU life is not for everyone and everyone can’t go to an HBCU. There are 105 of us and we 69 ▲ JOURNAL Summer 2012


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